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Tag Archives: 8211

Can’t get you out of my head

Can’t get you out of my head

Can’t get you out of my head “Trove Thursday” has presented Richard Strauss’s Salome and Jules Massenet’s Hérodiade, so today the good guy finally gets his chance with San Giovanni Battista by Alessandro Stradella featuring Christophe Dumaux as John the Baptist along with one of the composer’s beautiful cantatas featuring the superb English bass Peter Harvey.  Opera Lafayette and Heartbeat Opera recently teamed up for Stradella’s second-best-known work La Susanna  which is, like San Giovanni Battista, a ... Read More »

Bohemienne

Bohemienne

Bohemienne On this day in 1975, Régine Crespin sang her first Met Carmen. //www.youtube.com/watch?v=47JiSrHkoVQ Peter G. Davis in the London Times: Perhaps the most arresting and controversial performance to be seen at the Met to date this season is Régine Crespin’s Carmen, a role she had previously recorded and sung in concert but never before onstage. Crespin&8217;s Carmen is one of inexhaustible fascination and consistent vocal allure. Few would deny the latter, for the soprano ... Read More »

Super-artistry

Super-artistry

Super-artistry On this day in 1928, the Metropolitan Opera on tour in Ohio presented La Gioconda with Rosa Ponselle, Marion Telva and Giacomo Lauri-Volpi.  William G. Smith in the Cleveland Press Ponchielli’s intriguing opera “La Gioconda,” held the stage of Public Hall and an audience of something over 6,000 in thrall Wednesday night. And the latter instance is easily accounted for since it was another operatic disclosure that only the significant word superb can qualify. ... Read More »

In the old tradition

In the old tradition

In the old tradition On this day in 1950, Met audiences thrilled to hear a vivid singing actress performing the title role of Tosca for the first time… in Atlanta, Georgia.  One of the outstanding things about last night’s “Tosca” was the introduction to Atlanta audiences of a red-haired bombshell from Bulgaria, who burst with such terrific force that people here will be talking about it for a long time. Singing and acting the title ... Read More »

Burnished bass

Burnished bass

Burnished bass There are some singers that grab a hold of you from the very first time you hear them, turn you into a rabid fan, inform you of #art at the highest level as you know it, and mark you for life. I clearly remember the day I first heard the voice of Cesare Siepi.  In 1984, the then-new recorded format of the CD revolution was already firmly under way. Music shops were beginning to ... Read More »

Devil may care

Devil may care

Devil may care On this day in 2005, the Met opened a new production of Faust.  David J. Baker scrutinized the production with the trenchant rigor for which Opera News is so widely respected: The new Metropolitan Opera production of Gounod’s “Faust” (premiere, April 21) is remarkable for its unapologetic, indeed celebratory, approach to a work that often inspires producers to apply desperate corrective action. Director Andrei Serban and set and costume designer Santo Loquasto seem ... Read More »

Panglossed over

Panglossed over

Panglossed over Celebrating Lenny’s 100th this year has made Candide ubiquitous at opera houses worldwide. But the city most identified with its composer’s musical life had to make due with an overstuffed semi-staged gala at Carnegie Hall Wednesday night that sometimes threatened to sink Bernstein’s “problem child” but sterling performances by Paul Appleby and Erin Morley in particular saved the evening from the fate of the Santa Rosalia.  The audience at Carnegie was initially greeted by ... Read More »

Tragically Hippolyte

Tragically Hippolyte

Tragically Hippolyte From the moment months ago that Juilliard Opera announced it would be staging the first US production in nearly 20 years of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s monumental Hippolyte et Aricie my heart has been filled with admiration and gratitude. But just before the generally admirable first performance concluded Tuesday evening at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater the assembled forces committed such a catastrophic misstep that I had my head in my hands groaning in disbelief ... Read More »

Djinn and tonic

Djinn and tonic

Djinn and tonic Next week Juilliard Opera stages probably the greatest 18th century French opera Hippolyte et Aricie and to mark this eagerly awaited event “Trove Thursday” offers one of Rameau’s rarest full-length works, Acante et Céphise featuring The English Concert conducted by Trevor Pinnock (not pictured).  Of the four titans of 18th century opera—Handel, Gluck, Mozart and Rameau–the last unfortunately remains the least known and performed. One only rarely gets to experience his magical oeuvre ... Read More »

The trouble with Norma

The trouble with Norma

The trouble with Norma The tides in casting Norma are gradually changing. If one looks at trends in the last 40 or so years, the most successful Normas are mainly those who’ve made not just bel canto, but Bellini as a mainstay in their repertoire.  The majority of the dramatic sopranos still attempting the role have been met with a poor reception. Yet “tradition,” of casting large-voiced dramatics with minimal skills in florid song, still ... Read More »

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