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Home > Author Archives: Gabrielle Ferrari

Author Archives: Gabrielle Ferrari

Orientation

Orientation

Orientation At the the first Sunday matinee of the season and a revival of Franco Zeffirelli’s gold-plated production, Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s conducting was illuminating throughout, bringing forth colors and textures I’d never noticed before in Puccini’s weird, wonderful, glorious score. The brass players were on fire under his baton, the percussion pinged with energy. I think Turandot is truly one of Puccini’s best works, a fact made infinitely more complicated by the Orientalism baked right into ... Read More »

Portrait of a Lady on fire

Portrait of a Lady on fire

Portrait of a Lady on fire It was by turns laughably absurd (Witches in crew socks doing purse-ography? Talking bubbles?! from Hell?!?!?) and infuriating (Macbeth and Macduff literally bring knives to a gun fight, a swinging light gets in the way of two of the best scenes, including Lady M’s big aria.) Saving the show (barely) was tenor Matthew Polanzani‘s soaring, subtle, sincere Macduff, and Anna Netrebko&8216;s absolutely bonkers Lady Macbeth. Her murderess-by-proxy was half ... Read More »

Aestival body

Aestival body

Aestival body Broadway star Kelli O’Hara stepped out of her comfort zone with mixed results in the New York Philharmonic’s performance of Samuel Barber’s Americana masterpiece, Knoxville: Summer of 1915. Knoxville, which sets texts by American poet James Agee, describes a lazy summer evening with family “on quilts in the tall grass”, covered over with a haze of nostalgia that can make the piece somewhat eye-roll inducing even as it is occasionally stunningly beautiful. Agee’s ... Read More »

Drama is real

Drama is real

Drama is real Bass Daniel Fridley, who offered “plenty of spin and sparkle in his voice, perfect diction, and the exact resonance and gravitas I look for in a bass.” Teatro Nuovo put on a perfectly delightful show on Thursday night including the New York premiere of Donizetti’s Symphony in E minor and Rossini’s Stabat Mater in the Church of the Heavenly Rest. The Donizetti was charming, if not particularly brilliant. The composer was in ... Read More »

Ringing in my queers

Ringing in my queers

Ringing in my queers Stonewall threads some difficult needles with great success overall in this last installment of New York City Opera’s Pride Month Programming. I was impressed with the libretto particularly, which did an excellent job in creating characters that felt more or less lived-in in an extremely compressed time period (the whole opera is only 75 minutes long, and almost half of that is taken up by the raid and subsequent riot). We ... Read More »

Of two minds

Of two minds

Of two minds Mezzo Blythe Gaissert, Hannah after in NYCO’s As One. I wanted to like As One. I really did. This chamber opera, with only one character, two singers, and a string quartet who occasionally serve as a chorus, promises an uplifting, occasionally humorous story of a transgender woman’s journey through dysphoria and isolation to self-acceptance and freedom. While I certainly went on a journey, ultimately, I come with more problems than praise for ... Read More »

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