Discover the premier community for art enthusiasts, dedicated to discover the love of culture, visual beauty, and colorful masterpieces! Sign up to receive updates from the amazing world of arts.
Home > Author Archives: David Fox

Author Archives: David Fox

From Russia with love

From Russia with love

From Russia with love Martin Luther Clark and Samantha Long in Iolanta. Under any circumstances, the Russian Opera Workshop’s radiant concert performance of Tchaikovsky’s Iolanta would have been an event to celebrate. But coming at the conclusion of an intensive summer program of study, where more than 20 very promising young singers gained a new level of expertise and performance savvy—well, that makes it all the more special. For more than three weeks, the group studied ... Read More »

A little ‘Nixon’ goes a long way

A little ‘Nixon’ goes a long way

A little ‘Nixon’ goes a long way First of all—bravo to the Princeton Festival! Now celebrating its 15th season, this team effort has long been a “Little Engine that Could,” but the current operatic offering, John Adams’ Nixon in China, is a good deal more than that. Though I think the piece is ultimately a crowd-pleaser—certainly it seemed so at Sunday’s opening performance—it’s an ambitious and out-of-the-box choice, and one that requires substantial forces to ... Read More »

Lenny thing goes

Lenny thing goes

Lenny thing goes They saved the best (of all possible worlds) for last. I’ll admit I was wary, already feeling like the Leonard Bernstein Centenary had gone on forever—surely the iconic maestro should be 112 by now? And Candide, Bernstein’s problem child and failed Broadway musical, has become a particular focus of orchestras and opera companies. Once a rarity, attempts to resurrect it are now commonplace. Of course, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra would ... Read More »

Bolder sister

Bolder sister

Bolder sister I heard Brigitte Fassbaender live only twice—in 1985, as Octavian in a San Francisco Opera Der Rosenkavalier, and in 1994, at her recital of Wolf’s Mörike Lieder at Alice Tully Hall. But more than a decade earlier, through recordings, I’d already fallen in love with her voice and artistry. Fassbaender is the daughter of legendary German baritone Willi Domgraf-Fassbaender, and her voice seems to almost belong to a different time, when mezzos sounded richer ... Read More »

Star-crossed

Star-crossed

Star-crossed For more than 40 years, the magnificent opening image from Francis Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites seen above has served as an icon for the Met—and not only to advertise this opera.  The production (by director John Dexter, scenic designer David Reppa, and lighting designer Gil Wechsler) more generally represents the company at its absolute best. Let that be a lesson. The strength of Dexter’s Dialogueslies in its elegant simplicity. It’s a rare example of understatement ... Read More »

Nothing’s gonna charm you

Nothing’s gonna charm you

Nothing’s gonna charm you Third time’s the charm, they say—and I’ll give Encores!’ final production of the season, High Button Shoes, that it had some of that precious, often elusive quality.  Michael Urie is a charmer for sure, and it was fun to watch him channel the great Phil Silvers. That comic’s flint-edged style isn’t a natural fit for Urie, but he made a game try and exuded personality. And his singing is considerably stronger ... Read More »

Lenny and God

Lenny and God

Lenny and God First, the takeaway: Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s “Music of Faith” with the Philadelphia Orchestra was a sensational concert, perhaps the best I’ve heard in more than a season. Intriguingly juxtaposing two similar-but-very-different works composed 120 years apart—Bernstein’s Symphony No. 3 (Kaddish) and Rossini’s Stabat Mater—the maestro and his excellent collaborators were in tip-top form.  Though categorized as a symphony, Kaddish is difficult to define in a formal sense. In terms of forces—orchestra; two choruses (here, ... Read More »

Thank you for smoking

Thank you for smoking

Thank you for smoking How do you like your Carmen? Mezzo or soprano? Flirtatious? Confrontational? Smolderingly sexy? The role – and Bizet’s opera – contain multitudes.  I came to know and love Carmen first via records (Thomas Beecham with Victoria de los Ángeles, and Georg Solti with Tatiana Troyanos were early favorites), and a real revelation was hearing excerpts from 78s by the great Ninon Vallin. Her bright, silvery timbre, perfect French, and crisply elegant ... Read More »

Scroll To Top